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3D Printed Tonearm Install

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Adds an m44-7 Compliant Tonearm to the Numark PT01

Parts needed:
3D printed tonearm
needle nose pliers

notes:
-connecting the shure m44-7 to a stock PT01 reduces audio output loudness (due to cartridge/preamp mismatch)
-the preamp mod is highly recommended for use with the m44-7, which boosts the m44-7 loudness
-this tonearm mod improves skating, when bouncing
-add platter bars for best bounce performance

-Remove Existing Tonearm
1. See tonearm removal guide

-Bend Small Wires
2. Bend the small wires to a 90 degree angle form the wire housing to make an “L” shape (see pic_1_L_shape_wire)

pic_1_L_shape_wire
pic_1_L_shape_wire

-Install wire
2. Starting at the back side of the tonearm, and place the thick insulated part of the wire in the trough of the tonearm.
3. Slide the thick part of the wire along the trough towards the headshell. Allow the small wires to pass through the tight restraint sections of the tonearm. Don’t pull on the small wires. Just push the thick part of the wire, and guide the small wires through the restraint (see pic_2_wire install)

pic_2_wire_install
pic_2_wire_install

4. Continue sliding the wire through the tonearm until the small wires reach the headshell (see pic_3_wire_install_2)

pic_3_wire_install_2
pic_3_wire_install_2

-Mount the Cartridge
5. Connect the m44-7 or preferred cartridge to the tonearm wires
6. Mount the m44-7 to the headshell, by placing the nut on the topside of the headshell, and the screw/washer on the cartridge side (see pic_4_mount_m447)

pic_4_mount_m447
pic_4_mount_m447

-Install the Tonearm (David) Axle Rod
7. Place the tonearm on the tonearm base
8. Push the side of the rod that does not have a star on it through the tonearm (see pic_5_install_rod)

pic_5_install_rod
pic_5_install_rod

9. Guide the rod through the tonearm, metal tonearm base of the turntable, and opposite side of the tonearm
10. Press fit the star side of the rod into the tonearm plastic using a needle nose pliers (pic_6_press_fit_rod)

pic_6_press_fit_rod
pic_6_press_fit_rod

-Install Rubber Band Counterweight
11. Wrap the rubber band around the headshell side of the tonearm, and slide it towards the tonearm base (see pic_7_add_rubber_band)

pic_7_add_rubber_band
pic_7_add_rubber_band

12. Wrap the rubber band around the metal tonearm base (not the plastic part of the tonearm), and pull towards the back (see pic_8_rubber_band_base)

pic_8_rubber_band_base
pic_8_rubber_band_base

13. Align the rubber band with the grooves on the back of the tonearm, and attach to a tonearm peg (see pic_9_rubber_band_peg)

pic_9_rubber_band_peg
pic_9_rubber_band_peg

14. Adjust rubber band tension to control counterweight (see 3D printed tonearm counterweight adjustment guide)

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Tonearm Removal

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How to Remove the Tonearm from the Numark PT01

Parts needed:
straight pick, or thin metal rod (less than 2mm diameter)
-needle nose pliers (any and optional)

notes:
-the pin used for the tonearm axle has a star on one end
-the star does not fit through the metal part of the tonearm base
-the star must be pushed away from the tonearm to remove the pin
-the pics show a version of the tonearm that needs to be pushed from the inside out. try this first
-if pushing inside out doesn’t work, try pushing from the outside in, like in the video

-Remove the Tonearm Axle
1. Remove the tonearm axle by pushing the pin out with a straight pick (see pic_1_remove_pin)

pic_1_remove_pin
pic_1_remove_pin

-Remove Spring
2. Remove the spring, which attaches the tonearm to the tonearm base (see pic_2_remove_spring)

pic_2_remove_spring
pic_2_remove_spring

-Disconnect Wires
3. Disconnect the wires from the needle cartridge (see pic_3_disconnect_wires)

pic_3_disconnect_wires
pic_3_disconnect_wires

-Remove Wire from Tonearm
4. The tonearm wire is connected to the tonearm with adhesive. Hold the insulated part of the wire (not the tiny wires) and pull the wire away from the tonearm. see pic_4_remove_wire and pic_5_removed

pic_4_remove_wire
pic_4_remove_wire
pic_5_removed
pic_5_removed
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Supercollider MIDI Synth for Flesh MIDI Mod

Screenshot

This post describes a MIDI controlled software synthesizer intended for use with a scratch mixer having a Flesh MIDI Mod. The synth is built entirely in the programming language Supercollider 3. Sounds, which are generated using Supercollider’s unit generators, can be controlled externally via MIDI. The software synthesizer allows for simultaneous playback of sound loops and the software synthesizer. Example sound files are given to illustrate the functions of the synth.

Details on the next page…

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Orban 111b Spring Reverb Model

orban_face

The goal of this project is to learn a bit about modeling spring reverbs. The goal of this project is not to model an entire spring reverb unit through circuit analysis, but to take a look at it’s response by testing it with audio signals. The unit under test is the Orban 111b spring reverb. Details on how the springs affect audio, and how the springs look in the Orban 111b will be discussed. The tests will be presented and results will be posted.

Details on the next page…

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Custom Fader Cap for Rane 56

When I got my first Rane 56 mixer, the fader had a very pointed triangular cap. I definitely preferred the square fader caps used by Vestax. So, with the help of a master craftsman (Jesse), I designed and built a few custom Rane 56 fader caps. These caps have square, smooth edges with a lightly sanded surface (for a soft touch type feel).

Rane 56 Custom Fader Cap

Info about the build on the next page…

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PS3 Controller Mod (adding Xbox analog sticks)

Yesterday, I finished modding a couple PS3 controllers by replacing the PS3 analog stick caps with Xbox stick caps. I used third party red caps, cause they look bad-ass. I wouldn’t usually post such a simple mod, but it turned out to be a bit messy. I thought it would be useful to add my two cents to the mod.

Info on the mod on the next page…

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Flesh Modulation (FM) Effect

The Flesh modulation Effect is a FM transmitter audio effect. It has a stereo analog input (Line level), and transmits FM radio at it’s output.

The user has real time control of volume, input gain, modulation, dither, transmit level, and pilot level. The antenna can be removed and replaced with different antenna lengths (which affects transmit level).

Read more..

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loop 12

I think I’m getting arthritis in my hands:

Audio MP3

The drums on here are sampled from record with the sp1200, run through the Flesh Modulation effect, recorded onto PC, and then loaded into the MPC. The drums are not quantized (except the ride). All the synth sounds are the Meeblip run the the OTO Biscuit.